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Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil: Complex Terrain Modeling.


pdf icon Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil: Complex Terrain Modeling. (1419 K)
McGrattan, K. B.

NIST SP 995; Volume 2; March 2003.

Environment Canada. Arctic and Marine Oilspill Program (AMOP) Technical Seminar, 20th. Volume 2. Proceedings. June 11-13, 1997, Alberta, Canada, Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, 723-734 pp, 1997.

Keywords:

crude oil; oil spills; in situ combustion; pool fires; smoke; fire plumes; smoke movement; in situ burning

Abstract:

As part of the process of obtaining preapproval for the use of in situ burning in the event of an oil spill, numerical models have been used to predict the concentration of particulate matter or other combustion products downwind of the fire. The NIST model, ALOFT (A Large Outdoor Fire plume Trajectory), is based on the conservation equations that govern the introduction of hot gases and particulate matter from a large fire into the atmosphere. Because it is based on the fundamental equations rather than empirical correlations, simulations of burning in areas of very mountainous terrain, like the southern Alaskan coast, can be handled very easily using digitized terrain data at roughly 100 m resolution. The model has been applied to regions in Alaska, and predictions of distances from the fire where combustion product concentrations fall below ambient air quality standards have been made.