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Study of Two Phase High Liquid Loading Jet Fires. Annual Report. September 1, 1993-August 30, 1994.


pdf icon Study of Two Phase High Liquid Loading Jet Fires. Annual Report. September 1, 1993-August 30, 1994. (2322 K)
Wade, R. A.; Sivathanu, Y. R.; Gore, J. P.

NIST GCR 95-678; NIST SP 995; Volume 2; 50 p. March 2003.

Sponsor:

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD

Available from:

National Technical Information Service

Keywords:

blowout fires; fire research; fuel sprays; flame length; flame temperature; heat release rate; methane; oil spills; radiative heat loss; soot; sprays

Abstract:

High liquid loading spray jet fires occur in accidents involving fuel pipe leaks, tank ruptures and oil well blowouts. Laboratory simulations of such fires in the 10-30 kW range has recently become feasible using a novel effervescent atomizer burner. Measurements of flame length, radiative heat loss fractions, evaporation length, path integrated temperatures, and path integrated and local soot volume fractions in high liquid loading jet fires using this burner are reported. The data show that changes in evaporation length do not affect the flame length for the present operating conditions. The flame lengths increase with increasing heat release rate in an overall power law manner. Although the exit momentum for these flames is high, the power law behavior results from the effects of changes in radiative heat loss distribution with increasing firing rates. Increase in the mass flow rate of the atomizing methane from 5% to 25% causes a decrease in the soot volume fractions and an increase in the temperatures. The decrease in soot volume fraction and the increase in flame temperature have opposite effects on the visible flame length and radiative heat loss fraction.