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Effect of Wall and Room Surfaces on the Rates of Heat, Smoke, and Carbon Monoxide Production in a Park Lodging Bedroom Fire.


pdf icon Effect of Wall and Room Surfaces on the Rates of Heat, Smoke, and Carbon Monoxide Production in a Park Lodging Bedroom Fire. (1503 K)
Lee, B. T.

NBSIR 85-2998; 56 p. February 1985.

Sponsor:

Department of the Interior, Washington, DC

Available from:

National Technical Information Service (NTIS), Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161.
Telephone: 1-800-553-6847 or 703-605-6000;
Fax: 703-605-6900; Rush Service (Telephone Orders Only) 800-553-6847;
Website: http://www.ntis.gov
Order number: PB85-177988

Keywords:

beds (furniture); carbon monoxide; fire growth; flashover; fuel load; furniture; heat release rate; interior finishes; room fires; smoke; smoke detectors; sprinkler systems

Abstract:

A furnishing arrangement representitative of those in U.S. Park Service lodging facilities was evaluated for its open burn (free burn) characteristics. The arrangement consisted of a double bed with a wood headboard and one wood night table. The proximity of a wall and the effect of a room on the combustion of the same arrangement were examined. Wall finish materials were gypsum board and plywood. The presence or combustibility of an adjacent wall did not have a significant effect on the burning behavior of the furnishing arrangement. Nor did the effect of a room enclosure for the first few minutes subsequent to ignition. However, after this initial time interval, the effect of a room, lined with gypsum board finish, on the burning furnishings was pronounced, with flashover occurring as early as 233 s with heat release rates of over 2 MW. This compared with a peak rate of 1.2 MW for the open burn. Wood paneling in the room increased the peak rate to 7 MW. Mass flow of hot gases, smoke, and carbon monoxide from the room fires were measured. The use of a sprinkler or automatic door closing device activated by a smoke detector was shown to prevent room flashover.