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Comparison of the Fire Suppression Effectiveness of Sodium Bicarbonate Particles and Fine-Water Droplets in Non-Premixed and Premixed Flames.


pdf icon Comparison of the Fire Suppression Effectiveness of Sodium Bicarbonate Particles and Fine-Water Droplets in Non-Premixed and Premixed Flames. (203 K)
Chelliah, H. K.; Lazzarini, A. K.; Wanigarathne, P. C.; Linteris, G. T.

Halon Options Technical Working Conference. Proceedings. HOTWC 2001. Sponsored by: University of New Mexico, Fire Suppression Systems Assoc., Fire and Safety Group, GlobeTech, Inc., Halon Alternative Research Corp., Hughes Associates, Inc., Kidde, plc., Modular Protection, Corp., Next Generation Fire Suppression Technology Program, Sandia National Laboratories, Summit Environmental Corp., Inc. and 3M Specialty Materials. April 24-26, 2001, Albuquerque, NM, Daniels, B. L.; Cole, D. G., Editor(s)(s), 389-394 pp, 2001.

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Keywords:

halon alternatives; fire suppression; effectiveness; sodium bicarbonate; particles; fine water; droplets; premixed flames; flame inhibition; water mist; counterflow diffusion flames; halons

Abstract:

Two laboratory-scale experimental configurations are used to investigate the fire suppression effective-ness of condensed phase agents, e.g., fine-water droplets (with and without chemical additives) and sodium bicarbonate dry powder. The two flame configurations considered are premixed and non-premixed flame, which encompass most real world fires (except for the turbulence effects). With appropriate scaling relationships that take into account the structural features of the two types of flames, the flame inhibition results with condensed-phase agents indicate a similar trend. The observed differences between the two types of flames can be attributed to flow field involved in the two flames. The major implication of these observed differences is that extension of laboratory-scale flame inhibition results with condensed-phase agents to real world applications must be pursued carefully.