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Partnership for a National Computer-Integrated Knowledge Systems Network for High-Performance Construction Materials and Systems: Workshop Report.


pdf icon Partnership for a National Computer-Integrated Knowledge Systems Network for High-Performance Construction Materials and Systems: Workshop Report. (5308 K)
Clifton, J. R.; Sunder, S. S.

NISTIR 6003; 58 p. March 1997.

Available from:

National Technical Information Service
Order number: PB97-167506

Keywords:

construction materials; computer integrated knowledge system; construction industry; information technology; knowledge systems; pilot projects; workshop; high performance construction materials

Abstract:

The nation's construction industry is fragmented, being composed of many small firms; it tends to be a low profit margin industry which is averse to risk taking. Also, in general it is a low technology industry. However, changes appear to be occurring as the industry becomes increasingly aware of the importance of knowledge and information dissemination. Limits on knowledge of materials affects: the capacity to construct; construction productivity; durability of constructed facilities; and, becoming increasingly important, environmental issues. According to the Civil Engineering Research Foundation (CERF), the construction industry materials information technology needs include: (1) a universal base of knowledge; (2) inexpensive, decentralized, and user-friendly access; (3) an expanded level of information development and organization; (4) reliable information on risk and innovation, information is needed on i) material performance and durability, and ii) materials cost; (5) standardized methods for predicting life-cycle cost. The objectives of the workshop were to identify and priortize current and future needs of the construction industry for: (1) universal electronic access to distributed data, information, and knowledge on HPCMS; (2) new applications and/or new ways of using that data, information, and knowledge in (a) material design, processing, selection, and testing; and (b) facility design, construction or installation/application, operation, maintenance, repair, and disposal; (3) potential industry-university-goverment partnerships and pilot projects for testbed activities.