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Study of the Life Cycle Requirements for an Information Model of the Components That Are Incorporated in Process Facilities.


pdf icon Study of the Life Cycle Requirements for an Information Model of the Components That Are Incorporated in Process Facilities. (5749 K)
Arnold, J. A.; Teicholz, P.

NIST GCR 96-705; 122 p. March 1996.

Sponsor:

National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD

Available from:

National Technical Information Service
Order number: PB97-129589

Keywords:

research facilities; life cycle

Abstract:

This paper reports the results of research that explores product modeling issues for components that are incorporated in process plant facilities. This project begins with an information requirements study that identifies the industry stake holders, the business and technical processes involved in component information exchange, and the life-cycle information requirements of a typical process plant component, the control valve. The findings for the study are described through a review of the business issues, and through a process description of the 'life-cycle' of a valve within a hypothetical project context. Through this case study, the research attempts to identify data and engineering knowledge that should be included in a component information model to support and improve business process. In the final phase of the project, an information model and component selection test case for one component type is developed. Based upon the results of the information requirements study, the test case explores the integration of an explicit description of product data (including form, function, and behavior) and a task based process in a component information model. This model provides support for analysis and evaluation of component selection in an intelligent engineering application. It is proposed that the integration of product and process description in a component information model makes it possible to develop information exchange technologies that can effectively support and improve business process. This approach is compared to other efforts that are being pursued within the research community and industry, e.g., the STEP/EXPRESS initiative and related efforts.